Courses

Winter 2015

English 101 (Clark College)

  • Writing is a skill. Just as with any other skill (e.g., driving, playing videogames, lying to your parents) the more you do it the more proficient you become. Practicing writing makes you a better writer, so we do lots of that in this class. Gaining familiarity with the work of other writers (by reading) also makes you a better writer, so we do lots of that too. In this class we learn to understand reading and writing as complementary activities. Reading makes you a better writer, but writing also makes you a better reader as you learn to recognize common written structures, rhetorical strategies, and other “moves” that writers use. Think of this as a self-defense class for your mind.

Lit 301A — Survey of American Literature: Representations of Women (Marylhurst University)

  • This course explores a wide range of American literature by examining representations of women and femininity from U.S. colonial years, through the 19th and 20th centuries, and into our contemporary era at the start of the 21st century. Specific authors studied include Mary Rowlandson, Phillis Wheatley, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Henry James, Toni Morrison, and Louise Erdrich. Course readings will include many genres, including poetry, captivity narratives, slave narratives, short stories, novellas, and novels. The use of “close reading” strategies will be emphasized throughout the course.

Fall 2014

Lit 307 — American Literature: Origins to Civil War (Marylhurst University)

  • This accelerated online course in the English Literature and New Media program performs a brisk survey of American literature from the colonial years, through inventing nationhood, the early republic and antebellum years. Thematically we will confront issues of race and gender as well as anxieties about individuality, voice and democracy. As a method for exploring this early national literature, we focus on examining the wide variety of rhetorical strategies and genre conventions these writers employ to convey textual meaning—either asserting authority or undermining it. The use of “close reading” strategies is a major emphasis throughout this course.

English 270 — American Literature: 1920 to Present (Clark College)

  • This course provides an introduction to American Literature from 1920 to the present. By reading a variety of literary texts in the major genres, we will explore the progression from the beginnings of Modernism through World War Two and the Cold War, through the changes wrought by the social upheaval of the Vietnam War, the civil rights and women’s liberation movements. Finally, we will look at the changes of the last decades by examining a few works from the turn of the 21st century and the present era. Particular attention will be paid to works of literature that reflect the diversity of America’s changing demographic and the nation’s continuing development of its own sense of purpose and design. Throughout the course, we will continue to ask what it means to be American in an increasingly heterogeneous culture.

English 102 — Composition: The Research Essay (Clark College)

  • English 102 is designed to help you gain the skills needed to research and write about complex, intellectually challenging subjects. It will, therefore, ask you to produce a lengthy research paper (10-12 pages) by working through each stage of the research/writing process: topic selection, electronic and non-electronic research, topic revision, source evaluation, thesis and outline development, source integration and documentation, drafting, revision, and editing.

Summer 2014

Cultural & Media Studies 375E — Video Game Theory (Marylhurst University)

  • During the past two decades, video games have steadily increased in technical sophistication, economic importance and cultural significance. Declared the “tenth art” by French critics during the 1990’s, video games have also gradually become recognized by Anglo-American scholars as cultural artifacts worthy of serious study. In this course, students will become familiar with a range of theoretical approaches, such as ludology and narratology. During the course, students will be asked to apply various theoretical approaches to a number of games. Some prior familiarity with video games is encouraged but not required. A media and film studies course.

Writing 379E — Genre Writing: The Novel (Marylhurst University)

  • In this course, we examine the conventions of popular genre novels–from crime, mystery and thrillers to science fiction and fantasy to horror and westerns. While examining the current markets for genre novels, we will explore the vital aspects of characterization, narrative voice, plotting and pacing. Students develop a variety of tools to hone their writing craft while learning how to become professional writers in the any number of popular contemporary fiction genres. As with many writing seminars, we will do some  workshopping, but we’ll also be doing market research and preparing peripheral materials like pitches and synopses as a way to move toward publishing your work.

Spring 2014

English 102 — Composition: The Research Essay (Clark College)

  • See description above.

Winter 2014

Lit 301A — Survey of American Literature: American Gothic (Marylhurst University)

  • This survey course focuses on “American Gothic,” a genre of fiction that combines horror with romance, as expressed in a range of U.S. literature from early national roots to contemporary. Regional, ethnic, and gender diversity will be emphasized. The required course text is American Gothic: an Anthology 1787 − 1916 (Crow, Charles. L., editor. Malden, MA: Blackwell Publishers, 1999).  Specific authors studied include Poe, Hawthorne, Melville, Alcott and Dickinson.

Lit 223A — Introduction to Literary Genre (Marylhurst University)

  • In this course, we investigate the forms and functions of literary genre, examining their application to the interpretation of literature.  We explore the various forms that literary creations can take: fiction, poetry, drama and film.  Watching the evolution of these forms over time and their relationship to culture helps to provide our context for approaching literature.  This course also includes a brief introduction to using literary theory as an interpretive lens.

English 102 — Composition: The Research Essay (Clark College)

  • See description above.

Fall 2013

Lit 307 — American Literature (Marylhurst University)

  • This course explores a wide range of U.S. literature including early colonial and national roots, inventing nationhood, confrontations with race and gender, and anxieties about individuality, voice and democracy. As a method for exploring the literature of the American Republic, we focus on examining the wide variety of rhetorical strategies and genre conventions these writers employ to convey textual meaning—either asserting authority or undermining it. The use of “close reading” strategies is a major emphasis throughout this course.

Summer 2013

Lit 215E / Cultural & Media Studies 215E — Science Fiction: Historical & Contemporary Trends (Marylhurst University)

  • From its earliest beginnings as a speculative genre, science fiction has always attempted to address the various ways technological advances may answer (or fail to answer) the central questions of human experience. In this course, students explore current trends in the genre and examine how contemporary science fiction confronts issues of identity, culture, empire, intelligence, and the uses of technology as capital and power.

Winter 2013

Lit 223A — Introduction to Literary Genre (Marylhurst University)

  • See description above.

Fall 2012

Lit 301A — Survey of American Literature: American Gothic (Marylhurst University)

  • See description above.

Lit 368A / CMS 368A — Colonial & Post-Colonial Literature (Marylhurst University)

  • The voyage taken by Columbus in 1492 changed the world forever, not only for Europeans but also for the people inhabiting the continents “discovered.”  This course puts writers of the “old world” into dialogue with voices of the colonized.  Literatures of the colonized are among the most important voices in contemporary literature, expressing new perceptions on the experience of colonization, articulating a unique identity, and claiming a new version of the past.  The course ends by examining portrayals of the colonial enterprise in contemporary science fiction.

English 101 (Clark College)

  • Writing is a skill. Just as with any other skill (e.g., driving, playing videogames, lying to your parents) the more you do it the more proficient you become. Practicing writing makes you a better writer, so we do lots of that in this class. Gaining familiarity with the work of other writers (by reading) also makes you a better writer, so we do lots of that too. In this class we learn to understand reading and writing as complementary activities. Reading makes you a better writer, but writing also makes you a better reader as you learn to recognize common written structures, rhetorical strategies, and other “moves” that writers use. Think of this as a self-defense class for your mind.

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